Picture of Aviva Silburt
Aviva Silburt is a PhD student at the Balsillie School of International Affairs within the Global Environment stream. Her research examines natural resource management in conflict affected contexts. Her project aims to identify factors that can explain its effectiveness as a peacebuilding tool.

Prior to her studies, Aviva was a senior policy analyst at Public Safety Canada. She has previous experience working with Environment Canada, UN Women Canada, and has worked with NGOs and conflict affected communities on peacebuilding projects in Rwanda, Bosnia and the Philippines.

Aviva holds a Master of Arts in International Affairs from Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, specialized in conflict analysis and obtained her Bachelor of Arts with Honours in political philosophy at St. Thomas University.

Academic / Professional Awards

  • Balsillie Fellowship (2015), University of Waterloo
  • Advancing Women in Leadership Program (2015), Carleton University
  • Chris McDermott Kyoto Award for Climate Change Research (2012), Carleton University
  • Dean of Graduate Studies Entrance Scholarship (2011), Carleton University
  • Outstanding Scholar Award (2008, 2009), St. Thomas University
TOPICS
EDUCATION
  • Master of Arts, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (Carleton University)
  • Bachelor of Arts, Honours, St. Thomas University

Related Research Interests

See All Students
  • Photo of Francis Fortune

    Frances' broad research interests are governance challenges and policy setting in post conflict countries.

  • Nico Saunders

    Nico Saunders' interests are centered around social perspective on national security, and how that translates, or influences ‘community’ conflict prevention…

  • Nelson Graham

    Nelson Graham's research focuses on the opportunities and barriers that immigrants, specifically entrepreneurs, face in small to medium sized Canadian…

  • Picture of Clay Dasilva

    Clay’s research centers on the concepts of green growth and degrowth in global environmental governance.