Global Governance Course Offerings (MAGG)

Required Courses

Global Governance Core
 

GGOV 600 (UW) Global Governance and Globalization (core Political Science requirement)
Instructor: Dr. Jasmin Habib
Fall 2016
This course provides an overview of current scholarly debates relating to the interdisciplinary study of global governance in the context of globalization. It examines competing perspectives on globalization and global governance, and explores the sources and consequences of global power and authority, as well as the key actors, institutions, regimes, and norms of global governance. This course is open only to students in the MA program in Global Governance.


Economics Core
 

ECON 637 (UW)/GV 730 (Laurier) Economic Analysis and Global Governance
Instructor: Dr. Susan Horton
Winter 2017
This is the core economics course for the graduate program in Global Governance. The class will cover the basic theories of international trade and international finance, as essential stepping stones for an informed analysis of global economic issues. After establishing these foundations, the class will move on to discuss international policy issues. The inefficiency of the lack of cooperation in international trade policy-making and the need for multilateral negotiations have long been recognized. However, there is still a significant amount of debate with respect to the specific features of the multilateral trading architecture. The importance of coordination on monetary and financial issues is emphasized by the fragility of the current system. This is showcased by the frequency and rapid global contagion characterizing modern financial crises, and in view of the most recent episodes especially, is a topic of vivid contention. Chronic underdevelopment in many areas of the world is also recognized as a global issue requiring global solutions, while international environmental coordination is becoming increasingly regarded as a precondition for effectively addressing issues ranging from transboundary resource depletion to global warming. These will constitute the main policy areas explored in the second part of the course.


History Core
 

HIST 605 (UW) The History of Global Governance
Instructor: Dr. Bruce Muirhead
Fall 2016
This course examines the various ways global actors have identified and tried to solve global problems in the twentieth century. We will study the interactions between international organizations, state actors, non-governmental organizations, and informal interest groups as they have confronted global issues such as war, immigration, international trade, human rights, and environmental and health crises.


Field Courses

Conflict and Security
 

GGOV 630 (UW) Security Ontology
Instructor: Dr. David Welch
Fall 2016
(Cross-listed with PACS 634, PSCI 678)
This is a seminar in the ontology of security. Security is a contested concept, and in this course we ask what it is and how best to pursue it. What do we mean by security? What are we trying to protect? From what? Why? How do we do it? We begin by considering the concept of security in the abstract, and we then proceed to explore various specific conceptions. Along the way we encounter both traditional and non-traditional approaches to security.

*GGOV 631 (UW) Security Governance
Instructor: Dr. David Welch
Winter 2017
In this course we examine a range of "security" issues on the global agenda--both traditional and non-traditional--and examine recent and possible future institutional and policy responses. Issues examined include nuclear proliferation, terrorism, intrastate conflict, resource and territorial disputes, climate change, drugs, disease, and migration. Students will have an opportunity to research in depth a specific security issue of their choice.

GGOV 622 (UW) Complexity and Global Governance / 2015 Syllabus
Instructor: Dr. Thomas Homer-Dixon
Winter 2017
The course is an advanced seminar consisting of two major components: 1. an introduction to key concepts, theories, and empirical findings in complexity science, and 2. a review of the implications of our emerging knowledge about complex systems in three governance domains--energy, climate, and security. The first component surveys the major branches of thought about complexity in physics, biology, ecology, geography, information theory, technology studies, and economics. The second component highlights practical applications of complexity science in global governance, emphasizing research findings with clear policy implications. The course includes some exposure to computational methods of modeling complex phenomena and visualizing complex data. Assignments include three short integrative reports and a major paper.

GGOV 634 (UW) Gender and Global Politics
Instructor: Dr. Veronica Kitchen
Winter 2017
(Cross-listed with PSCI 620)
Does looking at the world through the lens of gender change how we see the state, sovereignty, diplomacy, security, trade, migration, globalization, governance, and other foundational concepts in global politics? We review feminist theories of politics, with a particular focus on international relations and global governance; examine how gender shapes the roles and experiences of women and men in global politics; and discuss how to do feminist research.

PSCI 655 (UW) Ethnic Conflict and Conflict Resolution I
Instructor: Dr. John Jaworsky
Winter 2017
(Cross-listed with PACS 661)
This course examines the causes of ethnic conflict but focuses in particular on the strategies which states use to manage or resolve such conflicts. The review of state strategies is comprehensive in nature, and includes approaches which are morally unacceptable as well as approaches which many consider morally desirable.


Global Environmental Governance
 

GGOV 620 (UW) Global Environmental Governance
Instructor: Dr. Thomas Homer-Dixon
Winter 2017
This course examines the ways in which environmental challenges are being addressed by means of 'global governance' - that is, international organizations and institutions intended to deal with these environmental challenges. Concepts are investigated both to help analyze the relative strengths and weaknesses of existing structures and to suggest ways in which alternative forms of global governance might advance sustainability. Specific organizations and other actors presently active in global environmental governance are given particular attention, as is the management of selected global environmental challenges.


GGOV 622 (UW) Complexity and Global Governance / 2015 Syllabus
Instructor: Dr. Thomas Homer-Dixon
Winter 2016
The course is an advanced seminar consisting of two major components: 1. an introduction to key concepts, theories, and empirical findings in complexity science, and 2. a review of the implications of our emerging knowledge about complex systems in three governance domains--energy, climate, and security. The first component surveys the major branches of thought about complexity in physics, biology, ecology, geography, information theory, technology studies, and economics. The second component highlights practical applications of complexity science in global governance, emphasizing research findings with clear policy implications. The course includes some exposure to computational methods of modeling complex phenomena and visualizing complex data. Assignments include three short integrative reports and a major paper.


Global Justice and Human Rights
 

*GV 760 (Laurier) International Human Rights
Instructor: Dr. Alistair Edgar
Fall 2016
This course will focus on the international human rights regime as a component of international law and global governance. It will begin with a discussion of the meaning of human rights and how they have been institutionalized within the United Nations system and in international law. It will continue with investigation of the history of human rights, and discussion of the debate about cultural relativism and human rights, particularly as it applies to the rights of women and gays/lesbians. The relationship of human rights to globalization will then be considered, with particular reference to markets and human rights, and the role of NGOs and civil society in promoting human rights in a globalized world. The last section of the course will investigate ways to rectify human rights crimes, including the role of human rights in foreign policy; genocide, war crimes and their aftermath; and new methods of justice and reconciliation, including apologies, truth commissions and reparations.


Global Political Economy
 

GGOV 610 (UW) Governance of Global Economy
Instructor: Dr. Eric Helleiner
Winter 2017    
(Cross-listed with PACS 630, PSCI 688)
A survey of the theoretical and public policy debates relating to regulation of the global economy, examined through case studies ranging from international banking an intellectual property rights, to labour and environmental standards and the control of illicit economic activity.

GGOV 619 (UW) Politics of International Trade
Instructor: Dr. Horatiu Rus / Syllabus
Fall 2015
This advanced undergraduate/graduate political economy seminar proposes an examination of the political underpinnings of international trade, taking a national, regional and multilateral perspective. The material discussed is both theoretical and applied with special attention to key institutional arrangements – including interest groups, domestic institutions and international intergovernmental organizations - important to trade policy making.


Global Social Governance

*GV 735 (Laurier) Global Social Governance / 2016 Syllabus
Instructor: Dr. Rianne Mahon
Fall 2016
This course examines the prospects for the supranational governance of social issues including the political and philosophical underpinnings of transnational social policy cooperation as well as examining specific issue areas such as global health policy and cross-national migration.

GGOV 644 (UW) International Migration
Instructor: Dr. Geraldina Polanco
Fall 2016
The ability to control international movement is considered a core element of state sovereignty, and the idea that people should not be able to move freely across international borders is now widely accepted. This course examines where this idea comes from, the concrete forms in which it has been implemented over time (such as the introduction of visa requirements, carrier sanctions, citizenship and language tests, databases, etc.) and how this implementation intersects with gender, race, class, and nationality. Through the study of migration theories, as well as empirical accounts, we will also analyze why and how people continue to move across borders, despite the barriers many face. Finally, the course asks whether managing migration 'works' and if so, in what sense and within which limits.

GGOV 662 (UW) Global Development Governance
Instructor: Dr. Suzan Ilcan
Winter 2017
(Cross-listed with SOC 781)

The course explores theoretical perspectives on the global governance of development, with critical attention to how processes of global development shape local environments and their inhabitants, challenge notions of state sovereignty and territory, and engender diverse responses to regimes of control. Cross-disciplinary perspectives will enable students to engage with a wide range of sociological, ethnographic, and political analyses of development through case studies and themes.


Multilateral Institutions and Diplomacy
 

*GGOV 650 (UW) International Organizations and Global Governance / Syllabus
Instructor: Dr. Andrew Cooper
Fall 2016
This course will examine the growing literature on international organizations and discuss their impact on global governance. The relevance, impact, and agency of international organizations will be considered. With the growing interdependence among states, international organizations are places where global governance decisions are made.

GGOV 658 (UW) Special Topics in International Diplomacy
Instructor: Dr. Andrew Cooper
Winter 2017
Diplomacy and foreign policy are usually discussed as though they are synonymous. From a more nuanced perspective, diplomacy is about the set of instruments used in international affairs via techniques of representation, information, communication and negotiation. This course highlights the work of diplomats and the machinery of diplomacy.
 

*denotes the core course for its field