The list of courses below contains information about required courses, and recommended elective courses. Subject to approval by the Program Director, students may take global governance-related courses offered by other graduate programs.

Required Courses

Global Governance Core

GGOV 600 (UW) Global Governance and Globalization

This course provides an overview of current scholarly debates relating to the interdisciplinary study of global governance in the context of globalization. It examines competing perspectives on globalization and global governance, and explores the sources and consequences of global power and authority, as well as the key actors, institutions, regimes, and norms of global governance. This course is open only to students in the MA program in Global Governance.
Instructor: Dr. Hongying Wang  |  Fall 2021

History Requirement

To fulfill the program’s History requirement, students must take one of the following courses, or a comparable graduate level History course.

HIST 605 Global Governance in Historical Perspective (0.50) SEM

This course examines the various ways global actors have identified and tried to solve global problems in the twentieth century. We will study the interactions between international organizations, state actors, non-governmental organizations, and informal interest groups as they have confronted global issues such as war, immigration, international trade, human rights, and environmental and health crises.
Instructor: Dr. Kate Bruce-Lockhart | Fall 2021

HIST 640 Digital History (0.50) SEM

Digital history, the application of new and emerging technologies to the study of history, is an important field that has begun to reshape historical production and scholarship. This graduate level course introduces students to the literature on digital history, and then puts theory into practice by digitally collecting, publishing, and producing new historical knowledge with cutting-edge tools.
Instructor: Dr. Ian Milligan | Winter 2022

HIST 660 Transnational and Global History: Old Problems and New Directions (0.50) SEM

This course examines transnational and global historical processes, focusing on temporal and geographic scales of analysis outside of traditional national histories, and promotes linking the local and the global. It looks at global forces influencing particular societies and encourages students to place themselves outside conventional local, regional, and national boundaries, and will critically consider a number of the metanarratives that have informed and continue to inform historiography, particularly idea such as modernity, progress, and the ongoing preoccupation with the ‘rise of the west’. Given these questions, and the almost endless scope of a course that purports to take the world as its focal point, weekly seminars will begin with a discussion of the possibilities offered by as well as the limits to transnational/global/world history, the various interpretative frameworks in use and their proponents as well as the challenges that transnational/global/world history poses. We will then focus on particular case studies or themes so as to promote discussion that is as much historiographical as it is historical. Such themes/case studies may include: feminism and imperialism, famine and climate change, disease and ecology, military technology and governmentally, global trade and the rise of consumer society(s), colonial knowledge and shifting ideas of race.
Instructor: Dr. Doug Peers | Winter 2022

Economics Requirement

To fulfill the program’s Economics requirement, students must take one of the following courses, or a comparable graduate-level Political Economy/Economics course.

Global Governance (GGOV) 610 Governance of Global Economy (0.50) SEM

This course examines current advanced debates in the field of international political economy (IPE). In the fall of 2021, the course examines competing worldviews in IPE, with a special focus on contemporary ideational challenges to neoliberal governance of the global economy in the contemporary age. What alternative worldviews are becoming prominent in the politics of the world economy? In what ways are they reshaping the governance of the global economy? What are the likely contours of a post-neoliberal era in the global political economy?
Instructor: Dr. Eric Helleiner Fall 2021

IP622 (Laurier) Power and Policy in the Global Economy

This course covers the politics of international economic relations. It focuses on the ways in which power, interests, institutions and ideas shape policy-making in the global political economy, and on the various kinds of actors that take part in the process. Topics covered include trade, regional integration, money and finance, foreign direct investment, development aid, natural resources and energy, agriculture, and the illicit/criminal side of the global economy.
Instructor: Dr. Derek Hall |  Winter 2022

Field Courses

Conflict and Security

GV 733 (Laurier) Security Ontology

This is a seminar in the ontology of security. Security is a contested concept, and in this course we ask what it is and how best to pursue it. What do we mean by security? What are we trying to protect? From what? Why? How do we do it? We begin by considering the concept of security in the abstract, and we then proceed to explore various specific conceptions. Along the way we encounter both traditional and non-traditional approaches to security.
Instructor: Dr. Simon Dalby |  Fall 2021

Sociology (SOC) 785 Cities and Security (0.50) SEM

An examination of the urban aspects of security, surveillance, war and terrorism. Particular attention will be given to the contemporary embrace of resilience as a rationality of urban security. Additional themes include the militarization of policing, the role of ‘big data’ in the intensification of urban surveillance, and the relationship between security and urban environments.
Instructor: Dr. Philip Boyle |  Winter 2022

Global Environmental Governance

Global Governance (GGOV) 622 Complexity and Global Governance (0.50) SEM

The course is an advanced seminar consisting of two major components: 1. An introduction to key concepts, theories, and empirical findings in complexity science, and 2. A review of the implications of our emerging knowledge about complex systems in three governance domains – energy, climate, and security. The first component surveys the major branches of thought about complexity in physics, biology, ecology, geography, information theory, technology studies, and economics. The second component highlights practical applications of complexity science in global governance, emphasizing research findings with clear policy implications. The course includes some exposure to computational methods of modeling complex phenomena and visualizing complex data. Assignments include three short integrative reports and a major paper.
Instructor: Dr. Michael Lawrence  |  Fall 2021

Global Governance (GGOV) 628 Topics in Global Environmental Governance (0.50) SEM

This course examines the ways in which environmental challenges are being addressed by means of ‘global governance’ – that is, international organizations and institutions intended to deal with these environmental challenges. Concepts are investigated both to help analyze the relative strengths and weaknesses of existing structures and to suggest ways in which alternative forms of global governance might advance sustainability. Specific organizations and other actors presently active in global environmental governance are given particular attention, as is the management of selected global environmental challenges.
Instructor: Dr. Andrea Collins  |  Fall 2021

GV 732 Advanced Topics in Global Environmental Governance (0.50) SEM

This course examines the ways in which environmental challenges are being addressed by means of ‘global governance’ – that is, international organizations and institutions intended to deal with these environmental challenges. Concepts are investigated both to help analyze the relative strengths and weaknesses of existing structures and to suggest ways in which alternative forms of global governance might advance sustainability. Specific organizations and other actors presently active in global environmental governance are given particular attention, as is the management of selected global environmental challenges.
Instructor: Dr. Simon Dalby  |  Winter 2022

Global Social Governance

Global Governance (GGOV) 642 Global Social Governance (0.50) SEM

This course examines the prospects for the supranational governance of social issues including the political and philosophical underpinnings of transnational social policy cooperation as well as examining specific issue areas such as global health policy and cross-national migration.
Instructor: Dr. Gerry Boychuk | Winter 2022

GGOV 644 (UW) International Migration

(Cross-listed with SOC 784)
This course explores theoretical perspectives on migration and critically examines how states deter or facilitate migration flows, including irregular immigration, refugees and asylum seekers, and low and high-skilled labourers. A multidisciplinary approach allows students to investigate the ubiquitous rise of border controls as a state tool to control migration, and how their implementation intersects with gender, race, class and nationality.
Instructor: Dr. Suzan Ilcan | Winter 2022

Multilateral Institutions and Diplomacy

*GGOV 650 (UW) International Organizations and Global Governance

(Cross-listed with PSCI 657)
This course serves as a survey of the international relations (IR) subfield of international organizations (IO) but focuses principally on formal, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs). We examine the growing literature on international organizations and discuss their impact on global governance, considering their formation, design, relevance, impact and agency. We apply this knowledge to the study of several highly institutionalized issue areas.
Instructor: Dr. Andrew Cooper  |  Fall 2021

GGOV 660 Public International Law

This survey course will provide students with a systematic introduction to the international legal system. Topics to be covered include: the origins and nature of the international legal system; the formation, sources and application of international law; the law of treaties; international legal personality; the institutional framework of international law; the relationship between international law and municipal law; the relationship between states and territory; law of the sea; state jurisdiction; jurisdictional immunities of states; state responsibility; and a selection of substantive international legal topics including, as time permits, international trade, international investment, the use of force by states, and/or international humanitarian law.
Instructor: Dr. Neil Craik  |  Winter 2022

*denotes the core course for its field